Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Bouregs

Welcome to the Hy
e Thyme Cafe. Although not all of my recipes are Armenian, the name is a little nod to my Armenian grandmother who is no longer with us. The Hye refers to all things related to her homeland, and she represents all things food-related to me, so the two just seemed to go together. I can't even claim that my Armenian recipes are truly Armenian, since Greece, Turkey, Armenia, Lebanon, Syria, and even Egypt share so many foods that they've all sort of morphed into one over thousands of years.

Whether you like to cook, bake, have never done either, or just like to play with your food...come on in and join me! :)


Thursday, March 5, 2015

Wonton Cheese Bouregs

Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg


I opened my freezer one day and realized that I had somehow accumulated multiple packages of wonton wrappers. Next to the wonton wrappers were boxes of phyllo dough and kadayif dough. In thinking about what I might feel like making and debating the uses for each, it occurred to me to try combining a few. That led me to making these Wonton Cheese Bouregs. Cheese Bouregs are wrapped in phyllo, but there is a similar version that uses the kadayif dough. I have only ever used that dough for making trays of Cream-Filled Kadayif.

My regular Cheese Boureg recipe also includes cottage cheese, but I left that out here because of the additional moisture. I did leave in the egg, but if you're worried about it not being cooked properly, you can certainly omit that. It does make the filling easier to mix and gives it a lighter texture, but it's not mandatory. You could also opt to fry them until they're a light golden brown, then transfer them to a tray, cover with foil and bake for an additional 10" or so. That's also a good way to keep them hot if making a huge batch - only I'd keep the oven at a low temp for that.

The one thing that I should have anticipated but didn't was that the moisture from the filling didn't allow for these to stay very crisp. The tails/edges are as crispy as you would expect, but the portion covering the filling softened. Maybe using less filling would help that, although I didn't actually find it to be particularly objectionable - just something to note. Another option might be to cut the cream cheese back to 6 oz.

Another difference between a wonton - as with an egg roll or rangoon - and a boureg is the use of a dipping sauce. Whenever I make any kind of egg rolls, there is a sauce involved, but that's not the case with a Cheese Boureg. Because this was a hybrid, I thought about what kind of sauce might go with the cheese and decided to heat together some hot pepper jelly and apple sauce. You often see cracker and cheese platters that include a hot pepper jelly, and the apple sauce cools it down while giving it more of a traditional Duck Sauce texture.


INGREDIENTS :
2 pkgs wonton wrappers
8 oz block of Muenster cheese - shredded
8 oz cream cheese - softened
1/2 c fresh chopped parsley
1 egg
Oil for frying - I used canola
Hot Pepper Jelly
Apple Sauce

  1. Wash and dry your parsley well, then chop either by hand or in a food processor.
  2. If using a food processor, you can take out some of the parsley so you're left with roughly a half cup, then pop in the shredder attachment and shred your Muenster right into the parsley - no need to clean it out first.
  3. Transfer the parsley and Muenster into a large bowl and add the cream cheese and egg (if using the egg), mixing until well incorporated.
  4. Open your first package of wrappers and, if they are particularly large, trim the edges so you are left with a more manageable-sized square. You can wrap and freeze the edges for another time - trim into strips and fry to sprinkle on Asian-inspired salads, etc.
  5. Place one wrapper on your work surface and add a line of filling diagonally across the middle.
  6. Dip a finger into a little bowl of water and run around the edge of the wrapper, then fold wrapper over the filling, pressing out as much air as you can and pinching to seal. I started out doing them flat on the counter, then realized it's actually easier if you fold it over tip to tip, then pick it up and hold it in one hand pressing out the air while pinching with the other to seal. You could also fold them into a triangle, then wet the corners and fold those in envelope style if you like.
  7. When you're about half way through wrapping, you can start heating your oil - about an inch deep or so over medium heat to get it started.
  8. When all of your wontons are wrapped, check on the heat of your oil by throwing in a drop of water and seeing if it immediately crackles and pops. If not, turn up the heat a bit - may need to adjust as you go along.
  9. Fry in small batches (on both sides) to make sure you don't over-crowd the pan. Presumably because of the fat content, I had a hard time getting the first few to flip, then realized if I dropped them in the oil and flipped them as soon as they popped to the surface, I would then be able to flip them again as needed. 
  10. Transfer to a paper-towel lined plate to absorb any excess oil.
  11. For the sauce, I just heated together a few tablespoons of hot pepper jelly with one of those little single-serve packets of apple sauce. I ended up really enjoying that and can't wait to try it with something else. :)

Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg
Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg

Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg

Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg
Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg










Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg


Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg


Hye Thyme Cafe: Wonton Cheese Boureg


No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...