Hye Thyme Cafe: Finish The Sentence Friday: "One of my favorite childhood memories is ..."

Welcome to the Hy
e Thyme Cafe. Although not all of my recipes are Armenian, the name is a little nod to my Armenian grandmother who is no longer with us. The Hye refers to all things related to her homeland, and she represents all things food-related to me, so the two just seemed to go together. I can't even claim that my Armenian recipes are truly Armenian, since Greece, Turkey, Armenia, Lebanon, Syria, and even Egypt share so many foods that they've all sort of morphed into one over thousands of years.

Whether you like to cook, bake, have never done either, or just like to play with your food...come on in and join me! :)


Friday, December 6, 2013

Finish The Sentence Friday: "One of my favorite childhood memories is ..."

Hye Thyme Cafe:  Finish the Sentence Friday
Pardon the 70s kitchen wallpaper!!

When thinking about my favorite childhood memories, many of them include my maternal grandfather.  One of the great things about him is that he always made a point of spending one-on-one time with each of the grands. 

As a buyer for Jordan Marsh, his career involved travelling the globe in search of oriental rugs.  Being Armenian, they could pretty much be found in every room of our houses.  Once he retired, he took horticulture courses and channeled his time and energy into gardening, which brings us to one of those memories.

There was one particular afternoon I remember when I was maybe 6 or 7 years old.  He brought me to the garden center with him to pick up supplies.  He gave me wheelbarrow rides around the place and took me to Friendly's for ice cream on the way home.  We also got pulled over for speeding, so he winked at me and put his finger to his lips to shush me, then very politely smiled at the police officer who approached his window and started speaking to him in Armenian.  The officer finally gave up in frustration and waved us on.

It was pretty funny to me, but I thought my Mom was going to kill him when she found out about that.  Hey, at least we remembered to stop at the farm stand for corn on the way home!

!!  I MISS YOU GRAMPY !!

Hye Thyme Cafe:  Finish the Sentence Friday

Hye Thyme Cafe:  Finish the Sentence Friday

Hye Thyme Cafe:  Finish the Sentence Friday
Hye Thyme Cafe:  Finish the Sentence Friday
Hye Thyme Cafe:  Finish the Sentence Friday




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Next week's prompt will be:  "This holiday season, I will ..."








26 comments:

  1. I loved your trip down memory lane with your maternal grandfather and must admit that I wrote all about my maternal grandfather and a funny story I remembered with him, too. But you also reminded me of a story I get told over and over, I was about 3 or 4 years old and in the car with both my grandparents. My grandfather was driving and he was cutoff by another driver. As it happened he said, "Son of a bitch." When I got home that day I totally ratted him out and said to my dad, "Poppy (that is what I called him) said son of a bitch!" Seriously, I loved my grandfather so much and poor buy got in trouble for that one by my grandmother for sure! But love that we do have these and so many other memories that make us smile about them!! Thanks for sharing and linking up with us again, Chris!! :)

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    1. You brat! I would never have ratted on Grampy - he did that himself LOL. He thought it was great that he got out of the ticket. Mom was mad that he was speeding with me in the car. One of my very earliest memories is of being sneaked into the hospital to see him after a heart attack. I was too young and wasn't supposed to be there. I still remember the day he got home. We were supposed to be SUPER careful around him, but when he walked in the door, I launched my toddler self down the stairs right into his arms. Sorry Gramps, couldn't help it! ;)

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  2. Cute - my "Pop-Pop" and I had hush secrets. There was a cupboard in the kitchen where the extra candy was kept. If Pop-Pop and I ate too much of what was in the living room candy dishes we would quietly replace it. For the longest I was the only grandchild who knew where the stash came from. I'm sure we weren't fooling her.

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    1. At my grandparents' house, the candy stash was in the top drawer of the china cabinet. The funny thing is that hutch is now in my sister's dining room, and every once in a while, I can't help but peek in that top drawer as I walk by. ;)

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  3. I love the old photos! Haha to your grandfather getting out of that speeding ticket. Knowing my luck, if I tried that, the officer would know the language too. Your 70's kitchen wallpaper rocks!

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    1. You should have seen the original - white background with huge red poppies, and for furniture, we had a pedestal table with a smoked glass top and these futuristic looking smoked bucket seats. I remember moving into that house and having the table delivered. I was 4 going on 5. They brought in the pedestal part, and as I walked under it, I commented on how small it was for the four of us to eat off of lol.

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  4. Love these photos, esp. the first with that amazing wallpaper backdrop!!! Really cool that so many of us wrote about our grandparents, I agree. And you are the third I've read that refers specifically to the maternal grandfather... interesting.

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    1. I never knew my paternal grandfather. As for my grandmother, she was never particularly interactive shall we say. She was quite a character though, and lived to be 108. :)

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  5. another great grandparent story...how wonderful life was back then...when we didn't realize how much it all truly meant.

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    1. I would gladly give anything for just one more day with them!!

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  6. What a great story! Those are beautiful memories, and beautiful photos. What a treasure. :)

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    1. It tickles me to no end to see him all dressed up in a suit sitting on a donkey, and down on the floor smoking a hookah. I know we had one in the house when I was a kid, but I never saw it used. I think it broke somewhere down the line.

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  7. Those are the kind of little things that I remember about my grandpa too. I've pulled people over who've claimed to not speak English, and as long as it was just for a traffic violation, there does become a point where it's easier to just say, "fuck it, go on." Lol.

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    1. He's just lucky we were at our place and not his - that town is referred to as Little Armenia, so the chances would have been higher that the officer knew Armenian.

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  8. It sounds like your grandfather knew how to find the joy in life - and shared it with you! What a funny story with the speeding ticket :)

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  9. HA! I love all the rugs - so beautiful!

    Your Grandad sounds like such a DUDE :D I also love that he behaved in ways your mom would've been mad about. Mine was like that, and it rocked. Grandparents get to break the rules, right? :)

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    1. Yup, being a grandparent must be the best job in the world! You get to give the kids back when they're young and so rambunctious you run out of steam and can't deal with them anymore, and you get to spoil them rotten. :)

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  10. I just got a ticket a few weeks ago - if only I spoke Armenian! Your grandfather sounds like a wonderful guy - so glad you have such great memories of spending time with him.

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    1. LOL - You? I wish I could speak it to try that one! Yup, that was the first loss I ever suffered, at the age of 13. I still don't think I've recovered from that one! :(

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  11. Grandpas are the best! I love this story. My grandfather was the same way, always a little mischievous! I remember when I was about 11, I wanted a pair of high heels more than anything else in the world and my mom said no way. My grandpa took me out and bought me the greatest pair and when my mom scolded him he just looked all innocent and sorry and said he didn't know. I got in a little trouble but I got to keep the shoes! I am so glad you have such wonderful memories of your grandfather and your pictures are incredible...love them!

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    1. My Mom totally would have confiscated those shoes lol. Although I do have a bunch of photos of him, the donkey and hookah ones are a few of my favorites - you get a sense of him through those.

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  12. Bahaha! I love it! What a fantastic story. Your grandfather sounds like a trickster, just like mine was! My partner always pretends he speaks a lot less English than he actually does whenever he wants to get out of a conversation. Your photos are amazing. What a fantastic cultural insight. Loved this post.

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    1. As big of a goof as he was, he was also very serious (contradictory like me I guess lol). Even when he was gardening, he was in dress pants, dress shoes and shirt. I think that might have been related to being first generation here.

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  13. I loved when my grandpa did sneaky things too and let me in on the secret. I hope our generation has a well developed sense of humor by the time we have grandkids to do the same thing. I'd like to think I will do that.

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    1. I never got around to getting married and having kids, so no grands for me, but my nephews better watch out when they have kids cuz Aunties are even more mischievous!! ;)

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